Tags : Cambodia

  • Phnom Penh is the gateway to an exotic land – the world heritage site, the largest religious complex in the world, the temples of Angkor in the west, the beaches of the southern coast and the ethnic minorities of the North-eastern provinces.

  • For such a small nation, Cambodia packs a lot in and its highlights are among the most exhilarating in the region. For many visitors, the nation’s premier draw is the mind-blowing temples at Angkor. The relics – the remnants of the capital of the once-mighty Khmer Empire…

  • A small country with many sky-scraping highlights, Cambodia is on the up as a tourist destination. Despite the majesty of the country’s attractions and the growing sophistication of its hotel and restaurant sector.

  • Imagine a country full of ancient and modern history, saturated with beautiful religious monuments, teeming with wildlife, and lush with rice fields, grasslands, and rivers. Get off the tourist trail and let our travel experts show you the real heart of Cambodia.

  • Wat Preah Prom Rath is one of most beautiful pagodas in Siem Reap. It is located on the river side near the old Market. The monestry has many fine, colourful wall paintings and you will find many modern statues inside. The pagoda was establisched in 1915 and is therefore one of the youngest pagodas in Siem Reap.

  • Wat Phnom translated as “hill temple” – is the tallest and most important temple in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh. The temple, first constructed in 1373, was erected on a man made, 88-foot-tall mound overlooking the city.

  • Wat Bo Pagoda, close to the Siem Reap River on the east side, is one of the oldest in Siem Reap and a peaceful place to escape and take a break from touring the major temple sites of nearby Angkor.

  • Wat Athvea is a sacred site located five kilometres South of Siem Reap town in Northwest Cambodia. The Wat Athvea complex comprises a modern pagoda (Wat Athvea) built next to an ancient temple from the Angkorian period (Prasat Wat Athvea).

  • The Leper King terrace is named after the “Leper King” statue that was found here. The terrace was built by Jayavarman VII in the late 12th century, directly North of the Elephants terrace.

  • Terrace of the Elephants is an impressive, two and a half-meter tall, 300 meter long terrace wall adorned with carved elephants and garudas spanning the front of Baphuon, Phimeanakas and the Royal Palace area at the heart of Angkor Thom.

  • Ta Prohm is the undisputed capital of the kingdom of the Trees’. It has been left untouched by archaeologists except for the clearing of a path for visitors and structural strengthening to stave of further deterioration.

  • Srah Srang is a baray, or reservoir, that is located south of the East Baray and east of Banteay Kde. Srah Srang was created by excavation in the mid-900s and, while there are several theories, it’s not clear whether the significance of this reservoir was religious, agricultural or a little bit of both. However, Srah Srang is best known as an ideal location for viewing the sunrise.

  • Siem Reap Art Center is located on the east bank of the Siem Reap River, right opposite the Old Market (Phsar Chas). Since its opening in 2012, this Siem Reap Art Center offers a broad mixture of locally manufactured products like silk, handicrafts, crocodile leather, clothing and many other souvenirs.

  • The Angkor Royal Enclosure is a walled-off area slightly to the north and west of the centre of Angkor Thom and which housed the palace complex of the Angkor kings. The palace itself was constructed of wood so nothing remains except for said surrounding walls which were constructed out of laterite, the sandstone-clad entrance gopuras and some stone lined bathing pools.

  • Pre Rup is one of the most popular sunset spots around Angkor, as the view over the surrounding rice fields of the Eastern Baray is beautiful, although some lofty trees have rather obscured it these days. Visitors who make the steep climb to the top of the temple will be rewarded with views of Angkor Wat’s spires to the west on clear days.

  • Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Centre is a wildlife centre located roughly 25 miles (40 km) by road south of Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The centre was established in 1995 and with an area of over 6,000 acres of protected regenerating forest, this is the largest zoo in Cambodia.

  • Phnom Kulen National Park is a National park in Cambodia. It is located in the Phnom Kulen mountain massif in Siem Reap Province. During Angkorian era the relief was known as Mahendraparvata (the mountain of Great Indra) and was the place where Jayavarman II had himself declared chakravartin (King of Kings), an act which is considered the foundation of Khmer Empire.

  • Phnom Bakheng is in the southwest of Angkor – whereat Phnom means “little hill”. This hill is a favoured place to see the sunset. From there you have a fantastic view to the hinterland, the city Siem Reap, Angkor Wat in between of the jungle, the Tonle Sap sea and the Western Baray.

  • Phimeanakas Temple is a Hindu temple in the Khleang style, built at the end of the 10th century, during the reign of Rajendravarman (from 941-968), then rebuilt by Suryavarman II in the shape of a three tier pyramid as a Hindu temple. On top of the pyramid there was a tower.

  • Neak Pean is one of the temples that make one dream of the golden days of luxury and beauty. It was worth while to the overpowering temples of Siva that men and armies repaired; but it was at the tiny temple of Neak Pean that eager princesses laid their lovely offerings of wrought gold and pungent perfumes.

  • A visit to Phnom Penh would not be complete without a visit to the National Museum of Cambodia, even if it is just to gaze at the renovated building. Inside the museum you will see the best collection of Khmer art, and there are a total of over 14,000 artifacts from prehistoric times to after the Khmer empire.

  • Kompong Phluk is a set of villages that are located on the floodplain of the Tonle Sap Lake, about 10 miles (16 km) from Siem Reap. The community, which consists of about 3,000 villagers, mostly live in stilted homes and depend on fishing and tourism for their livelihood.

  • Kbal Spean is a river in the jungle of Kulen Hills northeast of the main Angkor area. Its riverbeds and surrounding rocks are sculpted with myriad of Hindu symbolisms dating back from the 11th century. It’s about 25 kilometers from the most popular group of Angkor ruins.

  • Kandal Market is a genuine local market that is located in the center of Phnom Penh close to Riverside. The Khmer name of the market is Phsar Kandal which translates to “market in the middle” or “central market”, not to be confused with the “real” Central Market, Phsar Thmei.